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Tornadoes

Icon Depicting Tornado Funnel CloudKnowing what to do when you see a tornado, or when you hear a tornado warning, can help protect you and your family. During a tornado, people face hazards from extremely high winds and risk being struck by flying and falling objects. After a tornado, the wreckage left behind poses additional injury risks. Although nothing can be done to prevent tornadoes, there are actions you can take for your health and safety.

Helmet and Tornado Statement

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) continues to recommend, as its first recommendation, that people in the path of a tornado find a shelter or a tornado-safe room. The safest place in the home is the interior part of a basement. If possible, get under something sturdy such as a heavy table or workbench. If outdoors, lie down in a gully or ditch.

We understand that people are looking for any useful and effective ways to protect themselves. We don’t have research on the effectiveness of helmet use to prevent head injuries during a tornado, but we do know that head injuries are common causes of death during tornadoes. CDC has long made the recommendation that people try to protect their heads. Because the time to react may be very short, if people choose to use helmets they should know where they are and have them readily accessible. Looking for a helmet in the few seconds before a tornado hits may delay you getting safely to shelter. If people choose to use helmets, these helmets should not be considered an alternative to seeking appropriate shelter. Rather, helmets should be considered just one part of their overall home tornado preparedness kit to avoid any delay.

CDC continues to promote protective measures for use during natural disasters including tornadoes.

More detailed information on tornado safety >

Health and Safety Concerns for All Disasters

Illnesses, injuries, carbon monoxide poisoning, animals & insects, food, water, cleanup, mold, environmental concerns, and coping with a disaster. Learn more.

Be Ready! Tornadoes

This infographic includes important tips on being ready before and during a tornado.

Be Ready! Poster for Tornadoes

Be Ready! Tornadoes

Ready: Prepare. Plan. Stay Informed.Social Media at CDC Emergency

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